(Source: marvelmovies, via fucking-nerdzilla)

September 01, 2014 | {158766}

allaboutjapanese:

totemo-kawaii—ne:

Glamorous & Sexy Room Wear for Tokyo Princesses ♥

What do these fair maidens wear when simply relaxing at home? The answer is…Princess Room Wear!

♡ Feel free to browse them at Yume Tenbo via this handy link here.
♡ And yes, many are also available for overseas purchase at Rakuten’s English shop.

spaceoid:

Two childhood friends unexpectedly reunite on opposite sides of a demonstration in 1972

(via historythings)

September 01, 2014 | {464351}

fandomsandfeminism:

mossmallow:

katybuglove:

Okay, can we talk about this scene for a minute? I’m sorry if this has been mentioned, but I have a lot of feels, so I need to spew them in a word vomit. 

This is the scene in Lilo and Stitch when Nani’s come to the realization that she cannot take care of Lilo without a job, and she’s losing the last of her family. 

She sings the song “Aloha O’e”. Which is a fairly familiar song for most people, even if you’ve never been to Hawaii. Now I had no idea the significance of this song other than the song had the word “aloha” and it means goodbye. 

This is where it attacks you with feels. In case you didn’t know, Hawaii used to be a monarchy. And this song was written by their last Queen, QueenLiliʻuokalani when she was imprisoned and before her country was taken away: 

…Another of her compositions was Aloha Oe, a song she had written previously and transcribed during her confinement. In her writings, she says “At first I had no instrument, and had to transcribe the notes by voice alone; but I found, notwithstanding disadvantages, great consolation in composing, and transcribed a number of songs. Three found their way from my prison to the city of Chicago, where they were printed, among them the “Aloha Oe” or “Farewell to Thee,” which became a very popular song”. Originally written as a lovers’ good-bye, the song came to be regarded as a symbol of, and lament for, the loss of her country.

So this song is her lament of losing her country to invaders and outsiders because she was unable to take care of it. 

Just like Nani was unable to take care of Lilo. 

Nani who grew up learning about the proud heritage of Hawaii and their monarchy and their queen. She not only feels failure as a sister and guardian, but also as a Hawaiian. She’s not able to protect what is hers from outsiders. Someone has come, yet again, with legal prescient to take away what she should have taken care of. 

I must say, Disney, this is how you do cultural significance. This is how you pay homage. This is how you do respect. 

AND I JUST HAVE SO MANY FEELS. 

as a hawaiian, it makes me really happy to know that you understand how significant that song was.

Disney occasionally does it right. There is so much right with Lilo and Stitch. 

(Source: lovelyladykaty, via historythings)

still-alive-but-barelybreathing:

curryuku:

always-cachinnating:

themightynor:

moo58:

miniminihedgehog:

These two were supposedly based on a real couple, who said they wouldn’t board a life boat as long as there were younger people still aboard the ship. They both went below deck, presumably to their room, and that’s the last time they were seen.

;________________;

Isador & Ida Straus

The couple had been married for 41 years at the time of the disaster. They raised six children together, and were almost inseparable. On the rare occasion that they were apart, they wrote each other every day. They even celebrated their birthdays on the same day, although they were well apart from one another. During the sinking, Titanic’s officers pleaded with the 63 year old Ida to board a lifeboat and escape the disaster, but she repeatedly refused to leave her husband. Instead, she placed her maid in a lifeboat, taking her fur coat off and handing it to the maid while saying, “I won’t need this anymore”. At one point, she was convinced to enter one of the last two lifeboats, but jumped out as her husband walked away to rejoin him.

When last seen by witnesses, they were standing on deck, holding each other in a tight embrace. Their funeral drew some 6,000 mourners at Carnegie Hall.

A monument to them still stands in a Bronx cemetery, it’s inscription reads: “Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it.”

why wasn’t the movie about them

(Source: beben-eleben, via historythings)

September 01, 2014 | {792555}

(Source: aisuro, via shukku)

(Source: calcifer, via kiwi-moon)

(Source: hiphopandanime, via kiwi-moon)

(Source: hyliansword, via fuckyeahlink)

hyliansword:

"Epona! She’s grown quite fond of you, fairy boy!"

Requested by chymandah

(via godknowslife)